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Langdon gets active for National Fitness Day

Posted by Devon Partnership Trust in Mental health, News, Recovery and wellbeing on 30th September, 2020

The Physical Therapies Team at Langdon in Dawlish celebrated National Fitness Day last week by getting active.

National Fitness Day, held on Wednesday 23 September, celebrates the role that physical activity plays across the UK. It is a day when people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities come together to celebrate the fun of fitness.

The Physical Therapies Team at Langdon hospital spent the day making their way around the site trying to raise awareness of the importance of physical activity for patients and staff.

Jack Philips, Lead Physical Health Practitioner, said: "Our goal was to achieve a combined 500 repetitions of exercises such as squats, press ups, star jumps to achieve #langdons500repsfornationalfitnessday. By lunch time the amazing patients and staff had achieved well over 700 repetitions! Smashing the target. Thank you so much for everyone’s engagement there were plenty of smiles behind the masks we promise."

National Fitness Day brings people together to remind us why it’s good to move, highlighting the role that physical activity plays in helping us lead healthier, happier lives both physically and mentally.

Why is this important?

The UK faces a physical inactivity crisis, with evidence from UKactive showing that the average adult spends more time on the toilet every week than exercising. Physical inactivity leads to more than 20 long-term health conditions such as type-2 diabetes, some cancers and osteoporosis.

This is why National Fitness Day is so important – to inspire the nation to move a bit more and better understand the benefits of an active lifestyle. It is not only proven to improve our physical health, it also has an incredible effect on our mental health, our confidence, our social connections and helps us build better communities.

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